Thursday, August 11, 2016

PSSSST! WANNA SEE SOME PICTURES?

I was going to do this post on my other blog Cabinet of Curious Treasures
but since few people read it, I decided it's best to stay here and bore my regular readers. 

It's no secret that I like to collect antique art. I've curtailed this habit in recent years, simply because I don't have any more room to put it (nor money to buy it with). In Texas I had a huge house. Here in the hills of Tennessee my mountain shack only has room for me and my cats. It can't accommodate a gallery of artwork.

This is only a small sample of my collection. There are many more items - - and, of course, the movers "lost" several paintings....which is one reason why I have insomnia....and the burning desire to kill.



 An original painting by
Henrietta Ronner-Knip (1821-1909)
One of the most famous female artists of the 19th century. She painted "portraits" of Queen Victoria's pets. I acquired this (and another painting) from an Italian auction.



 More cat paintings (of course!). The one on the left is from 1870. The other is probably from the 1940's.

King Charles Spaniels
painted around 1770, anonymous German artist
(this is one of my favorites)

 Another of my favorites. This was painted in 1750 (artist unknown) and is a copy of the Madonna Della Seggiola by Raphael. It's huge and too heavy to hang on the wall.


A painting from Russia circa 1885
I love the moonlight theme and have this hanging by my piano in the living room

Bamburgh Castle, Coast of Northumberland, painted circa 1835
 The frame is in bad shape, but it's hanging over my antique desk.


 Boy Smoking
Italian painting from around 1875


Venice by Moonlight
a huge, heavy painting on masonite
by Italian artist Enrico Paulucci (1901-1999)


Fisherman and Wife
from England, 1890
(This one is hanging in my kitchen)


 Scene from the Alps by Bachmann
(love the painting, hate the frame)


 Another huge landscape, artist unknown.
This was in the den of my Texas home. Now it's in the living room of my TN shack. It has sentimental value - my Mom loved this painting.


This is by Gare Barks (her real name is Margaret). She was the wife of artist Carl Barks, who illustrated the Donald Duck character at Disney Studios for over 40 years.



Fisherman Street, Boulogne
a watercolor by Charles James Lewis (1830-1892)
this was originally purchased from Christie's (auction) in New York, but I acquired it from a private collection.

Am I boring you yet? Hopefully not. Heck, I'm on a roll.....And you're getting a private showing of my treasures.


 This is an 1835 copy of Gainsborough's Lady Sheffield
She has graced my living room for years. I call her The Blue Lady.


 My passion for landscapes never ceases. I bought this Austrian painting for the realism of the mountains....and for the fact that it was quite inexpensive.









 Two Rembrandt etchings (I kid you not)
The Three Trees and The Jewish Bride
(the bride in the etching is Rembrandt's wife)
Never had these appraised. Perhaps I can retire?? 


The watercolor on the left was painted in 1889 and attributed to Simeon Solomon.
The painting on the right is extremely old and in need of restoration. It has an official museum stamp on the verso, but it's faded and I can't read it. I love this one and it hangs in my bedroom. A rising moon with a woman walking on a lonely path.

 A lovely antique pastel, supposedly of T.E.Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) but on close examination I doubt if it's him.

 Africa, painted in 1915


Two watercolors by  John Sell Cotman (1782-1842)

 An original pencil illustration by Adrien Moreau (1843-1906) entitled The Betrothal.
This illustration was used in the novel Quest of the Absolute by Honore de Balzac.
(I love this one)



 An English watercolor of a baker's cart circa 1800 (It looks much better in real).



 My cat Scratch, ignoring a painting of two cats.

 
Thanks for enduring my tour. As I said, this is only a fraction of my collection. It would take several more posts to show all.




42 comments:

  1. The cottman watercolours are nice

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    1. I like his use of light and shadows.

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  2. Jon, this post made me feel like I'd just entered the Portland Art Museum! Such a fantastic private collection. Thank you for letting me take a peek :-)

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    1. I'm glad you appreciated it, Dylan. There are times when I think I should open a museum.
      I suppose sharing them on the Internet is good enough - except that I can't charge admission.....

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  3. This was really fun!! Fascinating--such a varied collection. I can see why you'd be furious when the mover lost part of your collection. I'd love to see more. :)

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    1. I still haven't recovered from what those incompetent movers did to me, even though it's been well over a year. I'm glad you enjoyed seeing my collection - I initially thought that it might be boring.

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  4. What a beautiful collection, please do show more!

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    1. Who knows, I just might be bold enough to do a sequel.....

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  5. Replies
    1. Hey, Jean, it's good to hear from you again. I hope all is well in your neck of the woods.

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  6. Different paint strokes for different folks. My favorites wouldn't interest you in the least, but there they are. The one I'd break your knees to have: THE JEWISH BRIDE.

    Thereafter: FISHERMAN AND WIFE. SCENE FROM THE ALPS. BOY SMOKING.

    I used to teach oil and watercolor painting at an art studio where some of my work was on exhibit, as well as the small museum in New Albany. I guess I'm a Jacquiline of many trades and a master of a few.

    Yes, Jon. You are rich via your surroundings, and if that "shack" really bothered you that much, you could be financially able to live wherever you wanted. It's all a matter of choices. Did you make the one that gives you happiness? My new post may interest you.

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    1. I can just see the headlines now:
      RECLUSIVE MUSICIAN DIES IN POVERTY
      LEAVING BEHIND A MILLION DOLLARS OF ART

      I studied art with several teachers when I was very young, and several of my paintings were displayed in a gallery in Anaheim when I was twelve. I also took a few drawing classes in college - but art was never my forte.

      The "shack" doesn't bother me too much. I think it's what I need at this point in my life - - solitude to reflect and sort things out.

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    2. When I was reading your post, I saw the very same headlines in my mind. Just make sure you STAY alive. I don't want to read those headlines EVER. I'm a very accomplished artist, but color is not my thing! Hard to believe, but just because I can do a lot of things doesn't mean I enjoy them all. I love the experimentation more than anything.

      It's a very wise man who does what needs to be done. The fact you went so far as to leave Hollywood for the sticks on a hill proves to me that you are a Renaissance man, as I am a Renaissance woman. One more shared trait. Love to you, my sweet man.

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  7. pussy pix! :)

    I like the swiss chalet (I have been to switzerland); the gare barks reminds me of bob ross (happy little trees); and dear scratch!

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    1. I couldn't exist without some pussy pictures. That Swiss chalet is built on a steep slope just like my house.

      I admittedly envy your trip to Switzerland.

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  8. Well, I see you don't like cats or art!!!! What a beautiful collection. Do you have it all hanging, or do you store some of it??? Your place I bet is quite charming. The artwork of Gare Barks reminds me a lot of my grandfathers paintings he did in landscape matter and technique. I wonder if my mother still has his paintings? Hmmmmmmm. Very nice post Jon.

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    1. I hope your mother still has your grandfather's paintings - they should be proudly displayed.
      My mountain retreat is twice as small as my Texas house was, so hanging space is limited (I'm deciding what tree I'll eventually hang myself on outside....).
      I've chosen my favorite paintings to hang in the house, and the rest are in storage.

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  9. What an absolutely stunning collection of artwork .... wow ! I hope you have them insured since you very well could be sitting on a gold mine. I've been staring at them for a good while trying to decide which painting I like most. Impossible really since there are so many ... but I truly adore King Charles Spaniels, Venice by Moonlight, and Fisherman and Wife. I appreciate this tour. Thanks for sharing some of your collection. Wonderful post, Jon.

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    1. I truly expected people to be bored with this post, and was surprised that it was appreciated. It is indeed very difficult to choose favorites. All of the paintings look better in real than on these photos.
      The King Charles Spaniels is painted on a board and is beautifully glazed, which gives it a sheen. The frame is original and is well-preserved.

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  10. Wonderful, Jon. I've gone over this post several times and been delighted each time. Before I was a gardener, I was a picture framer who specialized in restoring frames --yes, making molds of remaining scrollwork and casting replacement, working in gold-leaf etc. I later learned to restore the artwork itself. There was great satisfaction in conservation, and an adequate living, but such long hours and tortured feet and finally a decision to leave the studio and go outdoors. Your post brings back good memories for me. More please.

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    1. Your vast knowledge never fails to astound me, Geo. I'm sure you'd have a field day tackling my art collection - most of which is in desperate need of restoration. I've had success in GENTLY cleaning some of the paintings - - but after carelessly ruining one of them, I'd never attempt it again.

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  11. Nice post, Jon - REALLY nice! I enjoyed that.

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    1. Thanks a lot, Ray, I appreciate it. When I posted the paintings of cats I thought of you.

      Believe it or not, every time I eat now, I have a sense of guilt - knowing that you're not able to chew. I hope that you'll be able to get the dental work done soon...and enjoy a solid meal again! That was a NASTY fall!!

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    2. Thanx, Jon. The fall was - or might turn out to have been - a life-changer. Any remedial works is likely to take many weeks, more likely months. I'm still waiting to be called for an examination from a hospital jaw-specialist, even though last Mon my dentist said she'd get it ordered as a matter of urgency. Meanwhile, no corrective works have even started and eating remains a thrice-daily problem, my only being able to receive food sideways (left side only!) and it having to be cut up into small pieces. Also, the crusty outside of bread slices I've also got to cut off and then reduce the remainder to thin strips. Additionally, drinking without using straws is tricky but I'm getting to be able to do it without it all dribbling down my front. It's no fun at all, Jon, absolutely NO fun! One brief moment of inattention and your life can turn on a pinhead. But you yourself have learnt all about that

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    3. I can only imagine the agony that you're going through - not to mention the worry. I never realized how extremely serious a fall can be, and how it can destroy our lives.

      When I fell on the ice I fractured my spine in the exact same place where I had an old injury when I fell down a flight of stairs.
      As a result I now have extreme trouble with my posture - I can no longer stand straight, and my ability to walk is greatly impaired. I'm in pain after only a few steps. In bed, I have to sleep flat on my back. If I'm in any other position I get immense pain.
      In short, I'm damaged for life. And I have no medical insurance and can't afford a doctor.

      Well, I've indulged in self-pity long enough. Take care and keep us updated when you can.

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    4. Self-pity is an understandable indulgence, Jon. It alleviates the mental pressure when you can get it off your chest (though it's only a temporary relief), even though we're all very aware that to others it's a yawn - but they don't have to live with the effects first-hand.
      I know that despite my accident my present situation does not even begin to compare with what you've had to go through - and continuing.

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  12. I hope there are no potential or practicing art thieves reading your blog. Lock you doors! I love this portion of your collection.

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    1. I had the exact same thought. With my "luck", art thieves will find out where I live and pay me a visit.
      Fortunately, I live in the wilderness and my place is difficult to find (hopefully.....)

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  13. Your collection is absolutely breath-taking, and worthy of hanging in a prestigious museum. I sure hope you've had it appraised and insured. Thanks so much for sharing it with us. (More, please?)

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    1. Susan, I've never had it appraised....and my house is beginning to look like a museum. I love to be surrounded by old things (not including myself, of course...)

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  14. You must have a large house and rack them from floor to ceiling. The frames are beautiful too.

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    1. When I lived in Texas I had a large house. Since I moved to Tennessee I have a small place in the wilderness. I've managed to hang some of my favorite paintings, but many are in storage.

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  15. The Cotman and the Rembrandt are wonderful.

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    1. The Cotman and the Moreau are definitely among my favorites.

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  16. And this is but a portion? Yes, I'd love to see more! The King Charles Spaniels so remind me of my two pups. Most of the time they act like they hate each other, but come day's end they lay like this.
    I'm also drawn to Boy Smoking, Fisherman and Wife and Moon Rising. I can envision the latter as a cover on your next printing of Love Letters!

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    1. The King Charles Spaniels are hanging in my living room, next to the grandfather clock.
      I love the moon rising but it looks much better in real than on the photo. It's so old that the canvas has become threadbare. I can't decipher the signature. There is a museum stamp on the back but it's completely faded and illegible.

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  17. Like the Moonlight painting and of course the cats.

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    1. I'm always intrigued by cats and moonlight. And owls.

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  18. Jon,
    Fabulous, fabulous, fabulous pictures! We also have an art collection (mostly collected forty years ago) but nothing comparable to your FABULOUS collection. What a pleasure it was to look at them. I'll be back to this blog post again for the pure pleasure of looking at your paintings. Bill and I both love mountain landscapes too! Thanks for sharing. By the way, don't ever give your address on your blog (which I know you won't).
    Ron

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    1. Hey, Ron - I'm so glad that you enjoyed seeing these and I'd be delighted if you returned (it's easier than going to a museum!). I never get tired of looking at these paintings.

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  19. A tour worth the time. All lovely. And deeply personal to you, I know. my favorite, being how I'm a night owl has to be The moonlit painting from Russia.

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    1. I love anything to do with moonlight...or cats....
      from one hardcore night owl to another.

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